During your golf career, you have been given many basic techniques to help you make appreciable progress in playing or even in helping you just learn about the game of golf.

Most of these techniques are not that hard to learn, provided you first seek professional instruction, and then are willing to study and practice what has been taught to you. There is just no other way.

You will now come to the ways to correct the various errors (faults experienced by all golfers, even the best, from time to time) by way of practicing what you have been taught. You will begin to realize that abnormal lies or positions that your ball ends up in are not the only things that will cause your day of golf to be a little harder. Playing in the wind or on rainy days, an unusual shot that you will face will be frequent to all players.

There is considerable doubt whether anyone, beginner or the more experienced player, ever attains the maximum in perfection for all the shots you will be called to make. If you did, your performance would become monotonous, and there would be no challenge.

This is the main reason most people love the game once they have tried it. The longer you play, the more this feeling grows. There is just no game like it, bar none.

It is the only game where your opponent is yourself. Any mistakes which are made are yours alone. They are not dependent on what someone else does.

Many players have the idea that they are playing some other person as their opponent. To a degree that they want to achieve a lower score, they are. If one is careful to make as few mistakes as possible, and his playing companion does not use the same care, however, sooner or later the one with less mistakes will come out on top.

So play your real opponent, the golf course, and learn the shots which will help you to beat it.



ELWGA News

Forty-five ladies were on hand this past Tuesday for the weekly playday of the Elkins Lake Women’s Golf Association.

The format for the week was called a Nassau. There were three different ways to win in this game: low net on the front nine, low net on the back nine or low net for the 18-hole round.

Winners in the championship flight were: front nine, Marilyn Valka coming in with 33, and Jo Ann Holt scoring a 26 on the back nine, along with a total of 62 to take the 18-hole prize.

The first flight front-nine winner was Irene Crosby, winning in a scorecard playoff with a 34. Mary McClane took the back nine with a 30, while Irene Mouser’s score of 67 was good enough to win the total for the 18.

The second-flight winner for the front nine was Beverly Priddy with a score of 33 and also the total score of 66. Cecilia Early needed a scorecard playoff to take the back nine prize with a score of 32.

A score of 37 was good enough for Jo Ann Zwerneman to take the front nine in the third flight. Pat Gill took the honors on the back nine with a 31 and the total score with a 71.

The Lady Niners played a low net game. Jean Babcock took first with a 29, followed by Bett Docherty’s 34 which gave her the runner-up position.

YOUR REAL OPPONENT - THE GOLF COURSE





During your golf career, you have been given many basic techniques to help you make appreciable progress in playing or even in helping you just learn about the game of golf.

Most of these techniques are not that hard to learn, provided you first seek professional instruction, and then are willing to study and practice what has been taught to you. There is just no other way.

You will now come to the ways to correct the various errors (faults experienced by all golfers, even the best, from time to time) by way of practicing what you have been taught. You will begin to realize that abnormal lies or positions that your ball ends up in are not the only things that will cause your day of golf to be a little harder. Playing in the wind, rainy days, and unusual shot that you will face will be frequent to all players.

There is considerable doubt whether anyone, beginner or the more experienced player, ever attains the maximum in perfection for all the shots you will be called to make. If you did, your performance would become monotonous, and there would be no challenge.

This is the main reason most people love the game once they have tried it. The longer you play, the more this feeling grows. There is just no game like it, bar none.

It is the only game where your opponent is yourself. Any mistakes which are made are yours alone. They are not dependent on what someone else does.

Many players have the idea that they are playing some other person as their opponent. To a degree that they want to achieve a lower score, they are. If one is careful to make as few mistakes as possible, and his playing companion does not use the same care, however, sooner or later the one with less mistakes will come out on top.

So play your real opponent, the golf course, and learn the shots which will help you to beat it.



ELWGA NEWS



Forth-five ladies were on hand this past Tuesday for the weekly playday of the Elkins Lake Women’s Golf Association. The format for the week was called a Nassau. There were three different ways to win in this game: low net on the front nine, low net on the back nine or low net for the eighteen hole round.

Winners in the championship flight were: front nine, Marilyn Valka comin in with 33, and Jo Ann Holt scoring a 26 on the back nine, along with a total of 62 to take the 18-hole prize. The first flight front-nine winner was Irene Crosby winning in a scorecard playoff with a 34. Mary McClane took the back nine with a 30, while Irene Mouser’s score of 67 was good enough to win the total for the eighteen.

Second flight winner for the front nine was Beverly Priddy with a score of 33 and also the total score of 66. Cecilia Early needed a scorecard playoff to take the back nine prize with a score of 32. A score of 37 was good enough for Jo Ann Zwerneman to take the front nine in the third flight. Pat Gill took the honors on the back nine with a 31 and the total score with a 71.

The Lady Niners played a low net game. Jean Babcock took first with a 29, followed by Bett Docherty’s 34 which gave her the runner-up position.

Trending Video