Flag on moon

The deployment of the flag of the United States on the surface of the moon is captured on film during the first Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. Here, astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, stands on the left at the flag's staff. Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, is also pictured. The picture was taken from film exposed by the 16mm Data Acquisition Camera (DAC) which was mounted in the Lunar Module (LM). While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A top NASA manager is casting doubt on the space agency's ability to land astronauts on the moon by 2024.

Kenneth Bowersox, acting associate administrator for human exploration, told a Congressional subcommittee Wednesday that NASA is doing its best to meet the White House-imposed deadline. But he says he wouldn't bet anything on it.

Bowersox — a former space shuttle and space station commander — says it's good for NASA to have "that aggressive goal." He says many things need to come together, like funding and technical challenges, for 2024 to stand a chance. And he acknowledges there's a lot of risk in making that date.

The Trump administration urged NASA in March to accelerate its moon-landing plans by four years to 2024.

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